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Wale Gives the Street a Festivus Treat With Seinfeld-Inspired Mixtape

February 29, 2008 4:44 PM ET

Emerging rapper Wale is mining some unconventional material for his upcoming mixtape. Rather than rapping about dealing cocaine (like the Re-Up Gang's We Got It For Cheap, Volume 3) or aping Jay-Z (Jim Jones' Harlem's American Gangster), Wale is gonna be spitting rhymes about Kramer, Newman, the Soup Nazi and the rest of the Seinfeld crew on his street-bound The Mixtape About Nothing. The Washington, D.C. rapper boasts, "I think I've seen every episode, like, thirty times," a feat he shares with the entire population of Long Island. On one cut, dubbed "Hype," the rapper utilizes a long sample from one of Jerry's opening-credit comedy routines. But the biggest revelation is that Wale somehow successfully corralled Elaine Benes herself, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, to lend a brief skit to the mixtape. No street date has been set yet, but that hasn't prevented us from already dreaming up possible song titles. "Mr. Bookman?" "The Master of My Domain?" "The Bro vs. the Mansiere?" This mixtape might be the best, Jerry. The best.

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Song Stories

“You Oughta Know”

Alanis Morissette | 1995

This blunt, bitter breakup song -- famous for its line "Would she go down on you in a theater?" -- was long rumored to be about Alanis Morissette getting dumped by Full House actor Dave Coulier. But while she never confirmed it was about him (Coulier himself says it is, however), she insisted the song wasn't all about scorn. "By no means is this record just a sexual, angry record," she told Rolling Stone. "The song wasn't written for the sake of revenge. It was written for the sake of release. I'm actually a pretty rational, calm person."

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