.

Vines Man Has Asperger's

Nicholls diagnosed with mild type of autism

November 19, 2004 12:00 AM ET
Craig Nicholls, frontman of Australian rockers the Vines, revealed today in a Sydney courtroom that he has been diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome, a mild form of autism.

Nicholls was addressing assault charges for allegedly kicking a photographer and damaging her camera during a radio station gig at the Annandale House Hotel last May. The charges against the singer, who was diagnosed with Asperger's shortly after the incident, were dismissed on the condition that he continue to seek treatment.

Nicholls has been known for erratic or even confrontational behavior -- a problem that may have caused the Vines to pull out of Incubus' North American tour this summer.

Individuals with Asperger's, although of normal intelligence, have difficulty with two-way conversations -- often talking "at" others -- and reading social situations accurately. This often leads to the impression of the sufferers as purposely rude. Large social events and stressful circumstances can aggravate these symptoms.

The Vines released their sophomore album, Winning Days, in April and are planning to head back to the studio shortly. Nicholls will receive treatment for Asperger's as his schedule allows, but may have to take a hiatus from lengthy tours.

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