.

Video: Liz Phair Remembers 'Exile in Guyville

'This was when you really felt there was a mainstream music culture that we wanted to fuck with,' the singer tells 'Rolling Stone' at Matador 21. 'We felt we were making better music than the stuff you heard on the radio.'

October 4, 2010 1:27 PM ET

“Everyone who was making indie music knew each other. It was a small group of people,” Liz Phair told Rolling Stone, sitting high up in the Palms Hotel in Las Vegas during the weekend anniversary celebration for Matador Records, which released her acclaimed 1993 debut, Exile in Guyville. “This was when you really felt there was a mainstream music culture that we wanted to fuck with. We felt we were making better music than the stuff you heard on the radio.” She has a new album, Funstyle, set for release October 19th (on Rocket Science), but was in Vegas to reconnect with old friends, including the Matador art director who wandered into the nearby wilderness during the cover shoot for Whip Smart and, apparently, barely survived. “It's intense — everyone is coming together. We've all been dispersed, the culture has moved on. [But] it's alive, it's still happening. Thank God Matador did this. They made a weekend that I'll remember forever.”

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“You Oughta Know”

Alanis Morissette | 1995

This blunt, bitter breakup song -- famous for its line "Would she go down on you in a theater?" -- was long rumored to be about Alanis Morissette getting dumped by Full House actor Dave Coulier. But while she never confirmed it was about him (Coulier himself says it is, however), she insisted the song wasn't all about scorn. "By no means is this record just a sexual, angry record," she told Rolling Stone. "The song wasn't written for the sake of revenge. It was written for the sake of release. I'm actually a pretty rational, calm person."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com