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Video: Cat Power's 'Furious' Vision for New Disc

'I was inspired by being disappointed in myself,' Chan Marshall tells 'Rolling Stone,' explaining why she chose to play all the instruments on her new album herself

October 3, 2010 4:30 PM ET

 

Cat Power, aka Chan Marshall, has spent her entire 17-year recording career with Matador Records, where she felt safe to grow as an artist. “They had my back,” she told Rolling Stone at an after-party following the first night of performances at the Matador 21 “Lost Weekend” in Las Vegas. “They loved me unconditionally.” Marshall said the scene at Matador 21 made her nostalgic for her early days as a fan and performer. “It reminds me of being in New York and going to see shows,” she said. “That's what everyone I know here would do. It's cool because everyone's lives have gone on, and people have done different things, and they're all here.” Currently at work on a new album (with plans to play all the instruments herself), Marshall was making only her second live appearance ever in Vegas, where she previously tried her luck at the tables. “I put $10 on 13 black, and I got $400,” she said of her first time in a casino. “We gamble with life everyday. Then I went back and I didn't win. It was so weird.”

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Song Stories

“Stillness Is the Move”

Dirty Projectors | 2009

A Wim Wenders film and a rapper inspired the Dirty Projectors duo David Longstreth and Amber Coffmanto write "sort of a love song." "We rented the movie Wings of Desire from Dave's brother's recommendation, and he had me go through it and just write down some things that I found interesting, and they made it into the song," Coffman said. As for the hip-hop connection, Longstreth explained, "The beat is based on T-Pain. We commissioned a radio mix of the song by the guy who mixes all of Timbaland's records, but the mix we made sounded way better, so we didn't use it."

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