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VH1 to Honor Whitney Houston With 'Divas' Installment

Performance will be taped in Los Angeles in December

May 9, 2012 1:30 PM ET
whitney houston
Whitney Houston performs at the pre-Grammy Salute to Industry Icons honoring David Geffen in 2011.
Lester Cohen

According to Billboard, VH1 plans to pay tribute to the late Whitney Houston with a new installment of VH1 Divas. Houston's longtime musical director, Rickey Minor, will be the executive producer. Houston's family and label, Sony, have already expressed their support of the project. The performance will be taped in Los Angeles in December, though no artists have been confirmed thus far.

Houston appeared on Divas three times in her career, in 1999, 2002 and 2003. "We all felt that if any show could pay tribute to Whitney's music, it would be Divas," said VH1 president Tom Calderone. "December felt like enough time where it wouldn't be sad anymore, you'd want to celebrate her music."

Divas debuted in 1998 and is one of VH1's most well-known series, featuring performances from Mariah Carey, Aretha Franklin, Diana Ross, Tina Turner, Beyoncé, Mary J. Blige, Adele, and more. Houston died on February 11th in Beverly Hills, California. She was 48.

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