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Vevo's Major-Label Music Videos Moving to TV

Company partnered with Sony, Universal and EMI plans to offer interactive service on web-enabled TVs and devices

September 28, 2010 5:06 PM ET

Vevo, the company that partnered with Sony, Universal and EMI to serve those labels' music videos online (MTV struck similar agreement with Warner Music), plans to transition into television, the New York Post reports. Though they have yet to reach any agreements with cable or satellite companies, Vevo says they're already in talks with companies that produce TVs with web capabilities, and that they should be ready to launch by the time Sony makes their new HDTV set available.

Vevo TV is aiming to create an application that would work on varied devices like Roku, Apple TV, Google TV and the XBox 360. As for the programming, Vevo Chief Executive Rio Caraeff promises a mix of music videos, live performances and archival footage, which viewers will be able to personalize based on their tastes, using the interactive techology enabled by the web capabilities of the new TV players.

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“Bleeding Love”

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