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'Velvet Underground & Nico' To Get 6-Disc Reissue

Bonus material includes rehearsal tapes and live performances

July 26, 2012 4:10 PM ET
'Velvet Underground & Nico'
'Velvet Underground & Nico'
Verve

Universal will mark the 45th anniversary of The Velvet Underground & Nico, the band's pioneering debut, with a six-disc box set, the label has announced.

The collection, due October 1st, will feature a ton of alternate takes, live recordings, tracks from practice sessions and even Nico's entire album Chelsea Girl, which also came out in 1967.

Based on the tracklist, the alternate takes and mixes of the record came from sessions at Manhattan's Scepter Studio, while the practice tapes come from January 1966 rehearsals at the Factory – most likely the one owned and operated by Andy Warhol.

Rounding out the last two discs is a live show recorded at the Valleydale Ballroom in Columbus, Ohio. No date for the show is noted.

No details were available regarding the packaging or artwork of the new box set. The iconic pop-art banana cover on the original release was designed by Warhol, who's also credited with having co-produced the album.

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