.

'Velvet Underground & Nico' To Get 6-Disc Reissue

Bonus material includes rehearsal tapes and live performances

July 26, 2012 4:10 PM ET
'Velvet Underground & Nico'
'Velvet Underground & Nico'
Verve

Universal will mark the 45th anniversary of The Velvet Underground & Nico, the band's pioneering debut, with a six-disc box set, the label has announced.

The collection, due October 1st, will feature a ton of alternate takes, live recordings, tracks from practice sessions and even Nico's entire album Chelsea Girl, which also came out in 1967.

Based on the tracklist, the alternate takes and mixes of the record came from sessions at Manhattan's Scepter Studio, while the practice tapes come from January 1966 rehearsals at the Factory – most likely the one owned and operated by Andy Warhol.

Rounding out the last two discs is a live show recorded at the Valleydale Ballroom in Columbus, Ohio. No date for the show is noted.

No details were available regarding the packaging or artwork of the new box set. The iconic pop-art banana cover on the original release was designed by Warhol, who's also credited with having co-produced the album.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“San Francisco Mabel Joy”

Mickey Newbury | 1969

A country-folk song of epic proportions, "San Francisco Mabel Joy" tells the tale of a poor Georgia farmboy who wound up in prison after a move to the Bay Area found love turning into tragedy. First released by Mickey Newbury in 1969, it might be more familiar through covers by Waylon Jennings, Joan Baez and Kenny Rogers. "It was a five-minute song written in a two-minute world," Newbury said. "I was told it would never be cut by any artist ... I was told you could not use the term 'redneck' in a song and get it recorded."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com