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Unreleased David Bowie LP 'Toy' Leaks Online

Scrapped album features new versions of Bowie's obscure early material

March 22, 2011 1:05 PM ET
Unreleased David Bowie LP 'Toy' Leaks Online
Jamie McCarthy/WireImage

David Bowie's Toy, an album that was originally intended to be released in 2001, has leaked online. A high-quality rip of the full 14-track record surfaced on bit torrent sites on Sunday, much to the delight of Bowie completists around the world.

Photos: David Bowie

The album – a set featuring re-recorded and significantly revamped versions of some of Bowie's earliest and most obscure songs – was shelved due to a dispute with Virgin, his label at the time. Though two tracks on Toy – "Uncle Floyd" and "Afraid" – were eventually reworked for his 2002 album Heathen  and three others – "Baby Loves That Way," "Shadow Man" and "You've Got A Habit of Leaving" – were released as B-sides for that album's singles, the majority of the record has not been available until now.

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It is unclear how this music leaked, or if Bowie has any intention of ever giving the album an official release.

UPDATE: Bowie's office has declined to comment on this leak.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

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