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U2's Adam Clayton Sues Bank of Ireland

Bassist claims accountants gave him inaccurate reports for misappropriated funds

February 27, 2012 3:25 PM ET
adam clayton
Adam Clayton of U2 attends the private preview of the 2011 Pavilion of Art & Design in Berkeley Square in London.
Dave M. Benett/Getty Images

U2 bassist Adam Clayton is suing the Bank of Ireland Private Banking and the accounting firm Gaby Smyth Co. over €4.8 million in misappropriated funds. According to The Irish Independent, Clayton says that his former personal assistant, Carol Hawkins, took the money over a five-year period ending in November 2009.

The rocker is seeking €4.38 million – nearly $7 million – in damages for the firm's "alleged negligence and breach of contract." Clayton says that the accountants told him that the misappropriated sum was €13,585 million when it was actually closer to €4.4 million in a September 2008 report.

Clayton has a separate lawsuit against Hawkins, who was charged with 184 theft and fraud charges in January 2011.

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