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U2 Say 'Invisible' Is a 'Sneak Preview' of New Album

Band will premiere the song in partnership with Bank of America and (RED) charity

U2 perform in Beverly Hills.
Jonathan Leibson/Getty Images for J/P Haitian Relief Organization
January 31, 2014 1:40 PM ET

One week after announcing the release of new song "Invisible" during Sunday's Super Bowl, U2 opened up about the song, the accompanying commercial for Bank of America and the band's partnership with non-profit organization (RED).

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According to USA Today, the band will perform the track during a Bank of America ad, which will double as the company's partnership launch with (RED). The band remained guarded on details of the commercial, though Bono said it has morphed from the original idea. "One plan was for us to go knocking on doors in the middle of America, thanking people for saving lives," said Bono. "But a couple of band members thought that might seem self-aggrandizing."

The commercial/premiere will direct fans to download the track for free starting Sunday at 6 p.m. until 11:59 p.m. on Monday, with Bank of America donating $1 for every download—up to $2 million—to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.

"We're taking all the energy around the Super Bowl and interest in what U2's doing and flipping it into the fight against HIV AIDS," said the U2 frontman. Bono co-founded (RED) in 2006 with activist Bobby Shriver and the charity hopes to eliminate mother-to-child HIV transmission by 2015.

Watch U2 Perform "New" Song "Sunday Bloody Sunday" at 1983 US Festival

While the upcoming Super Bowl spot lines up with U2's previously reported plan to announce a new album, set for release this spring, "Invisible" is not the album's first single. "We have another song we're excited about to kick off the album," Bono said. "This is just sort of a sneak preview — to remind people we exist."

The band has been recording the follow-up to 2009's No Line on the Horizon with Danger Mouse at Electric Lady Studios in New York City. U2 will also be Jimmy Fallon's first musical guest when he debuts as the new host of The Tonight Show on February 17.

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