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U2 Get in Bed With Apple

Mega-band and mega-corp forge unprecendted deal

October 21, 2004 12:00 AM ET

Following the ubiquitous images of U2 gyrating to their new single "Vertigo" in a TV spot for Apple's iPod and iTunes, the band and the corporation are set to announce that they've partnered to release a special-edition iPod pre-loaded with U2 music this fall.

The unique black iPod will be preprogrammed with the band's upcoming album, How to Dismantle an Atomic Bomb, as well as a greatest-hits mix of tracks from their catalog. With these added perks, this version of the music player will cost $30 more than the original.

"Vertigo" is currently the top seller on the iTunes online music store -- ahead of new tracks by superstars Eminem, Usher and Destiny's Child -- breaking the U.S. record for digital download sales in a single week.

This marks the first time the band has partnered with a major corporation, going so far as to meld their performance of a new single with the look and feel of that company's existing ad campaign.

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Song Stories

“Money For Nothing”

Dire Straits | 1984

Mark Knopfler wrote this song with Sting, and it wasn’t without controversy. The Dire Straits frontman's original lyric used the word “faggot” to describe a singer who got their “money for nothing and their chicks for free.” Even though the slur was edited out in many versions, the band, and Knopfler, still took plenty of criticism for the term. “I got an objection from the editor of a gay newspaper in London--he actually said it was below the belt,” Knopfler told Rolling Stone. Still, "Money For Nothing," undoubtedly augmented by its innovative early computer-animated video, stayed at Number One for three weeks.

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