.

U2 Consider "Joshua Tree" Producers

September 18, 1998 12:00 AM ET

Figure it'll take at least six months for U2 to count the fifty-million simoleons the group raked when it signed a record deal calling for the release of three "best of" albums. By then, U2 should be ready to get back into the business of making music -- and more money.

When that happens, U2 will likely look to the producer tandem that brought the Irish quartet many of its greatest hits during the Eighties and early Nineties. Though nothing's written in stone, last Saturday in Dublin the band took a preliminary meeting with Brian Eno and Daniel Lanois, the two architects behind 1991's Achtung Baby, 1988's The Joshua Tree and 1984's The Unforgettable Fire, three of the band's biggest commercial successes. The pair also teamed up for U2's experimental Zooropa (1993) and Eno last worked on the equally-enigmatic Passengers: Original Soundtracks 1 (1995), which featured the producer and all members of U2. Last year's commercial disappointment Pop was produced by Flood.

According to a source close to Lanois, the producers and U2 will meet again some time next month to discuss possible recording locations and recording times for the project. Right now Lanois is on vacation and Eno is busy producing James' forthcoming album, which should be completed by the end of November. A source close to Eno says production on a new U2 album won't begin until at least March.

"We imagine they'll work on it through next year," says the source close to Eno, who added it could take them through the summer to complete the album.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com