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U2 and Muse Cover Talking Heads, Bowie and Rolling Stones

The two bands were celebrating the end of their South American stadium tour

April 15, 2011 12:00 PM ET
U2 performs live on April 9, 2011 in Sao Paulo, Brazil.
U2 performs live on April 9, 2011 in Sao Paulo, Brazil.
Marcos Alvez/Globo via Getty

U2 and Muse officially wrapped up their South American stadium tour on Wednesday night, but hours after the show ended they headed over to the Sao Paulo nightclub Bar Secreto and continued  playing on a considerably smaller stage. You'd think anything that happens super late night at  Bar Secreto remains a secreto, but thankfully somebody brought a camera and uploaded some of the songs to YouTube. Click here to watch Bono cover "Psycho Killer" with Larry Mullen Jr. and Muse's Dom Howard on drums. Click here to watch bits of every song, including The Edge singing "Miss You" and "Let's Dance" and Mullen take a rare turn at the mic with "The Wild Rover." It's unclear if Adam Clayton and the rest of Muse were in the club. Maybe they were playing next door at Bar Super Secreto.

(h/t ATU2)

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