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Tracy Chapman Flies With Flea

Singer-songwriter enlists Chili Peppers bassist for "Where You Live"

July 6, 2005 12:00 AM ET

Tracy Chapman will release Where You Live, her seventh studio album and first album in three years, on September 13th. Co-produced by Chapman and Tchad Blake (Phish, Bonnie Raitt), the album features the Red Hot Chili Peppers' Flea on bass, Joe Gore (PJ Harvey, Tom Waits) on guitar, Mitchell Froom (Paul McCartney, Sheryl Crow) on keyboards and Quinn (Belinda Carlisle, Paula Cole) on drums.

"I made some great friends on this album," says Chapman, who in addition to acoustic guitar tried her hand at clarinet. "I had run into Flea a few times over the years, and he'd said to me at one point, 'If you're making a record and you want me to, I'll play on it.' So I took him up on the offer."

Flea makes his presence known behind Chapman's passionate vocals on the anthemic single "Change." Other standout tracks include the gospel-tinged "Talk to You," the jazzy, percussion-heavy "Before Easter" and the sparse, haunting "Never Yours."

"It's mostly recorded live," Chapman says of the album. "It's a new direction for me, sonically and thematically."

Chapman is planning a worldwide tour behind Where You Live in the fall.

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