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Tom Morello to Perform at Occupy Wall Street

Guitarist will play solo set as the Nightwatchman

October 12, 2011 6:00 PM ET
tom morello occupy wall street
Tom Morello attends the "Real Steel" Los Angeles Premiere at Gibson Amphitheatre.
Steve Granitz/WireImage

Rage Against the Machine guitarist Tom Morello has announced plans to perform at the Occupy Wall Street protest at noon tomorrow in Manhattan. Morello, who has previously performed at the Occupy Los Angeles rally, will play a solo set as the Nightwatchman.

"The Nightwatchman will Occupy Wall Street tomorrow at noon, adding one more voice to the growing chorus of millions demanding economic justice at home and around the globe," Morello tells Rolling Stone. "And I'll be playing some songs. Likely in the rain."

Morello will be the third major act to perform at the protest. Neutral Milk Hotel's Jeff Mangum and rapper Talib Kweli have recently played impromptu sets at the protest site. Earlier this week, Kanye West visited the scene, but did not perform.

Related
Jeff Mangum Plays Occupy Wall Street
Talib Kweli at Occupy Wall Street: 'We Have to Grow'
Photos: Occupy Wall Street
Deer Tick Rock to Raise Awareness for 'Occupy Wall Street'
What Occupy Wall Street Is Really About
'Occupy Wall Street': Drawing the Battle Lines
Taibbi on the 'Occupy Wall Street' Protests

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