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Tim Dog, 'F--k Compton' Rapper, Dead at 46

East Coast rapper suffers seizure

Tim Dog performs at Wetlands in New York City.
Steve Eichner/WireImage
February 14, 2013 5:36 PM ET

Bronx rapper Tim Dog died today from a seizure following a lengthy battle with diabetes, reports the Source. He was 46.

Born Timothy Blair, Tim Dog reached fame in 1991 with "Fuck Compton," a diss track toward Dr. Dre and N.W.A. – one of the most provocative salvos in the East Coast/West Coast rap tensions of the day. The song appeared on Tim Dog's debut album, Penicillin on Wax, and prompted a rebuttal track from Dre himself. Tim Dog went on to release the East Coast rap disc Do or Die in 1993 and form Ultra, a hip-hop duo with Kool Keith. In the 2000s, he released two albums and was name-checked in tracks by Eminem and Nas.

Questlove's Top 50 Hip-Hop Songs of All Time: 'Fuck Compton'

In 2011, Tim Dog pled guilty to grand larceny for swindling a woman out of $32,000 in an online dating scam, a scandal covered in a 2012 episode of Dateline NBC. He was sentenced to five years' probation.

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