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Tiesto's­ 'Take Me' Gets Michael Brun Remix – Song Premiere

Song featuring Kyler England becomes dancefloor opus

Tiesto
Dimitri Hyacinthe
October 25, 2013 9:00 AM ET

On October 28th, Musical Freedom will release two new remixes of Tiësto's summer smash "Take Me," featuring singer Kyler England, which initially appeared on the Club Life Vol. 3 – Stockholm compilation. "'Take Me' has been a huge track for me since the summer, so it's cool to hear another artist's interpretation of it," Tiësto told Rolling Stone – and now you can take a listen to one such reworking, courtesy of Michael Brun. 

Peek Inside the Life of Tiësto

Working with an already-certified pop club banger, Brun took Tiësto's jittery piano jam and shot it to the moon, turning "Take Me" into a spacey dancefloor opus that manages to jack-up the massive feel of the original. "I really like what Michael's done with his version," the Dutch DJ adds.

"I've always looked up to Tiësto as one of the legends in the industry so it was an honor to remix 'Take Me' and receive his seal of approval," Brun says. "I wanted my remix to to be groovy and sexy but still energetic, while also emphasizing the great vocals from Kyler England."

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