.

Thenewno2, 'Never Too Late' - Song Premiere

Dhani Harrison records at Abbey Road for the first time

thenewno2
David Zonshine
January 23, 2013 8:00 AM ET

As young Dhani Harrison tagged along with his father George, Abbey Road Studios became a constant presence in his life. But although Harrison has long been familiar with the legendary studio, he had never recorded there. So when his group thenewno2 were tapped to score Beautiful Creatures, Harrison and bandmates Paul Hicks and Jonathan Sadoff ventured to Abbey Road for an experience full of firsts.

"I spent my whole life in and out of Abbey Road. Paul really spent a lot of his life there, 12 years mixing and engineering," Harrison tells Rolling Stone. "Recording at Abbey Road was emotional: My first time recording there, my first time hearing something we composed for an orchestra of that size and my first major Hollywood film soundtrack." But Harrison didn't let the weight of the experience damper his creative vision, tapping guests like Ben Harper, the Duke Spirit's Leila Moss and Paul's father Tony (of the Hollies) for the project while staging grandiose arrangements. "I was able to put a 54-piece orchestra in Studio 2, which is really weird," he said. "It's where my dad spent a lot of his formative years, as well as Paul's dad, who recorded in Studio 1."

The Beautiful Creatures soundtrack is out February 12th. Beautiful Creatures opens February 14th.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
New and Hot Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com