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The Who Delay Covers Album, Townshend Working On New Songs

September 12, 2008 3:05 PM ET

The Who's covers album has been delayed, thanks in part to producer T Bone Burnett's obligations to the Robert Plant & Alison Krauss tour. "It still probably will happen, but I think the smaller the idea is kept, the better," Roger Daltrey told Billboard.com. "Small and fluid, maybe just something for our Website." The band initially planned to include Motown classics and James Brown songs on the proposed covers album. In the current lull, Daltrey said, Pete Townshend is working on new songs. "[Townshend] doesn't like to talk about it," Daltrey said. "He doesn't know if he likes it until he knows what it's going to sound like. You just have to be there for him if he needs you." Daltrey also think he has one more solo album left in him, adding, "I feel there must be an enormous amount of really talented songwritgers out there who can't sing, so, please, send me your songs."

Related Stories:
The Who Prep Covers Album
What's Next for the Who? "We've Done Enough Already," Says Daltrey
The Who Deliver Big at Rock Honors Tribute Featuring Pearl Jam, Foo Fighters

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

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