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The Week in Music: Rihanna Opens Up, Rebecca Black Fights Ark Music Factory and More

Plus: Avril Lavigne on getting divorced, the Arcade Fire rock out in Haiti and Buffalo Springfield returns

April 1, 2011 5:55 PM ET
The Week in Music: Rihanna Opens Up, Rebecca Black Fights Ark Music Factory and More
Photograph by Mark Seliger for RollingStone.com

In the new issue of Rolling Stone – on newsstands today – Rihanna speaks openly about her relationship with Chris Brown, her taste for kinky sex and her upcoming role in the movie version of the boardgame Battleship. You can go behind the scenes of the shoot for her hot, instantly iconic cover shoot – and find out the secret of her skimpy metallic shorts.

Gallery: Extended Excerpts From Rihanna's Rolling Stone Cover Story

We also looked into the emerging conflict between internet sensation Rebecca Black and Ark Music Factory, the company that produced her viral pop hit "Friday"; talked to Avril Lavigne about her new album and recent divorce; learned all about Linda Perry's new band Deep Dark Robot; chatted with Social Distortion about their new record and tour; caught up with the classic line-up of Hole at a film screening; and went inside the upcoming Buffalo Springfield reunion tour.

Photos: Random Notes

On the pop culture front, Peter Travers reviewed the confusing but exciting new movie Source Code, we profiled British funnyman Ricky Gervais, shared a lost interview with the late Elizabeth Taylor and recapped the Jersey Shore season-ending reunion special. Rob Sheffield argued that Steven Tyler has become the savior of American Idol, while Mallika Rao commented on the contestants' underwhelming performances on Wednesday's Elton John-themed episode and the double-elimination in Thursday's results episode.

Photos: Shakira Visits Haiti for School Opening

We also reviewed the Mountain Goats' concert in New York City and got exclusive photos from the Arcade Fire's show in Haiti, analyzed this week's pop charts and looked back on this week in rock history. Plus, singer-songwriter Hayes Carll came to our office to play some songs, the mysterious R&B singer known as The Weeknd was named our latest Artist to Watch and as always, we reviewed all the week's biggest new releases.

The Hottest Live Photos of the Week

Also: The second round of our Do You Wanna Be a Rock & Roll Star? contest is under way. Eight bands are competing to not only appear on the cover of Rolling Stone, but also win a contract with Atlantic Records and make their debut television appearance on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon. This week we posted free MP3s of new songs recorded by each contestent with big-name producers. We encourage you to check out all the bands and vote for your favorites -- your vote counts, so let your voice be heard!

Photos: Rolling Stone Cover Contest Bands Take NYC

We also posted a gallery of your Top 10 favorite bassists of all time, as determined by your votes on Facebook and Twitter. Our question for you this weekend is: What was the best song of the Sixties? You can answer on our website, on facebook.com/rollingstone or on Twitter with the #weekendrock hashtag.

LAST WEEK: Spring Music Preview, 'Sucker Punch' and More

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

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Song Stories

“You Oughta Know”

Alanis Morissette | 1995

This blunt, bitter breakup song -- famous for its line "Would she go down on you in a theater?" -- was long rumored to be about Alanis Morissette getting dumped by Full House actor Dave Coulier. But while she never confirmed it was about him (Coulier himself says it is, however), she insisted the song wasn't all about scorn. "By no means is this record just a sexual, angry record," she told Rolling Stone. "The song wasn't written for the sake of revenge. It was written for the sake of release. I'm actually a pretty rational, calm person."

More Song Stories entries »
 
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