.

The Strokes Party at the Hard Rock Hotel in Vegas

'It's a place of debauchery. That's what the Strokes are all about!' says drummer Fab Moretti

December 12, 2002
The Strokes, The Fillmore, Fabrizio Moretti, Albert Hammond Jr, Nick Valensi, Julian Casablancas and Nikolai Fraiture
The Strokes at the joint In The Hard Rock Hotel on November 9th, 2002 in Las Vegas Nevada.
Denise Truscello/WireImage

It has been said that Las Vegas is a town so wild, it would kill a sober man. So rejoice in the news that the Strokes made it out alive. Barely. “Vegas is good for about two days,” says Strokes guitarist Albert Hammond Jr. “Then it's too much for the stress level.” The boys were there to rock the Joint at the Hard Rock Hotel, along with indie song-slingers Ben Kweller and Adam Green of the Moldy Peaches. Says Hammond, “Last night I was gambling in the casino until seven in the morning. I won!” Adds drummer Fab Moretti, “It's a place of debauchery. That's what the Strokes are all about!”

This story is from the December 12th, 2002 issue of Rolling Stone. 


To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Santa Monica”

Everclear | 1996

After his brother and girlfriend both died of drug overdoses, Art Alexakis -- depressed and hooked on drugs himself -- jumped off the Santa Monica Pier in California, determined to die. "It was really stupid," said the Everclear frontman, who would further explore his personal emotional journey in the song "Father of Mine." "I went under the water. Then I said, 'I don't wanna die.'" The song, declaring "Let's swim out past the breakers/and watch the world die," was intended as a manifesto for change, Alexakis said. "Let the world do what it's gonna do and just live on our own."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com