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The Strokes Hit L.A.'s Viper Room for Celeb-Packed Gig

In attendance were Gwen Stefani, Kelly Osbourne, Jimmy Fallon, and more

November 27, 2003
The Strokes, The Fillmore, Fabrizio Moretti, Albert Hammond Jr, Nick Valensi, Julian Casablancas and Nikolai Fraiture
Julian Casablancas of The Strokes performs at Bill Graham Civic Auditorium on October 21st, 2003 in San Francisco, California.
J. Shearer/WireImage

When the New York leather boys in the Strokes hit L.A.'s Sunset Strip for a radio-station-sponsored gig at the Viper Room, they drew an E!-cluster of celebs including Gwen Stefani and Gavin Rossdale, Jimmy Fallon, the Donnas' Brett Anderson and Drew Barrymore (although she is the drummer's girlfriend). When singer Julian Casablancas asked the audience, "Is this a small-venue show or a corporate gig?" Kelly Osbourne offered this: "It's one of those shows you do to suck corporate dick!" Casablancas had tender words for the crowd: "You guys in the front rock! The rest of you, fuck you! I don't give a fuck!" Thanks for sharing, Julian.

This story is from the November 27th, 2003 issue of Rolling Stone. 

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