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The Stooges, Genesis, Abba Prep for Historic Rock Hall Induction

March 15, 2010 6:15 PM ET

Tonight at New York's Waldorf Astoria, the Stooges, Genesis and Abba will join the esteemed Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, along with the Hollies and Jimmy Cliff. Green Day's Billie Joe Armstrong, Phish's Trey Anastasio, the E Street Band's Steven Van Zandt and Wyclef Jean will induct the honorees, and Chris Isaak, Faith Hill, Ronnie Spector and members of Maroon 5 are scheduled to take the stage to cap with the ceremony with live performances. As RS reported, Peter Gabriel will not attend the ceremony, preventing a full Genesis reunion; similarly, half of Abba will not be in attendance.

Stay tuned for a full report from the scene, plus photos from tonight's big event and the scoop on what went down behind the scenes. And watch the show live on Fuse, starting tonight at 8:30 p.m.

Read Rolling Stone's full story on the inductees here:

The Stooges, Genesis, ABBA Lead the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's Class of 2010

Plus, check out our special Q&As and photos of the honored artists:

Q&A: The Stooges' Iggy Pop
Q&A: Genesis' Mike Rutherford and Tony Banks
Q&A: ABBA's Benny Andersson
Q&A: The Hollies' Graham Nash
Photos: Jimmy Cliff

Get all of Rolling Stone's Rock and Roll Hall of Fame coverage here.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

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Song Stories

“Money For Nothing”

Dire Straits | 1984

Mark Knopfler wrote this song with Sting, and it wasn’t without controversy. The Dire Straits frontman's original lyric used the word “faggot” to describe a singer who got their “money for nothing and their chicks for free.” Even though the slur was edited out in many versions, the band, and Knopfler, still took plenty of criticism for the term. “I got an objection from the editor of a gay newspaper in London--he actually said it was below the belt,” Knopfler told Rolling Stone. Still, "Money For Nothing," undoubtedly augmented by its innovative early computer-animated video, stayed at Number One for three weeks.

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