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The Phil Spector Trial: We Watch Court TV So You Don't Have To (07/18)

July 18, 2007 9:24 AM ET

WHAT HAPPENED YESTERDAY? Coming off the momentum of their most successful witness so far, the defense made a complete U-turn, shifting their focus from Lana Clarkson's suicidal tendencies to criticizing police procedure on the night of her death. The move was disastrous: Instead of showing that the police were overzealous, James Hammond of the Alhambra PD testified that Spector was unresponsive, refused to obey orders and behaved so erratically at the crime scene he had to be tasered. In short, Spector acted like someone who just killed someone, and not someone who witnessed a suicide. The defense realized their error in calling Hammond to the stand and wrapped up their questioning quickly.

IS THIS GOOD OR BAD FOR SPECTOR? Bad. And even worse, Judge Fidler told the defense that they could not call former Hollywood madam "Babydoll" Gibson to the stand, who claims Clarkson once worked for her as an escort. Fidler ruled there's little (and possibly forged) evidence to support this.

HAIR & WARDROBE UPDATE: Spector's wardrobe is starting to incorporate metallic-looking garments, as evidenced by his shiny black tie and red shirt.

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