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The Phil Spector Trial: We Watch Court TV So You Don't Have To (07/11)

July 11, 2007 9:16 AM ET

WHAT HAPPENED YESTERDAY? Playwright John Barons took the stand as the first of a likely parade of defense witnesses that will testify about Lana Clarkson's "depressed" mental state leading up to her death. Barons had cast Clarkson for the part of Marilyn Monroe, her dream role, in a play he had written, only to fire her days before the play was to open. Barons said he only cast Clarkson because she was an acquaintance of filmmaker Roger Corman, and later dropped her from the production when she tried to claim responsibility for some script rewrites. The defense delicately attempted to paint Clarkson as a fame seeker while trying not to offend the jury by speaking too ill of her.

IS THIS GOOD OR BAD FOR SPECTOR? Neither. While the defense showed Clarkson might have been depressed after being fired, the prosecution got Barons to admit she was nowhere near suicidal from the ousting.

HAIR & WARDROBE UPDATE: Spector successfully coordinated his new wig with a silver-gray suit, periwinkle-blue shirt and blue tie.

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Song Stories

“Bird on a Wire”

Leonard Cohen | 1969

While living on the Greek island of Hydra, Cohen was battling a lingering depression when his girlfriend handed him a guitar and suggested he play something. After spotting a bird on a telephone wire, Cohen wrote this prayer-like song of guilt. First recorded by Judy Collins, it would be performed numerous times by artists incuding Johnny Cash, Joe Cocker and Rita Coolidge. "I'm always knocked out when I hear my songs covered or used in some situation," Cohen told Rolling Stone. "I've never gotten over the fact that people out there like my music."

More Song Stories entries »
 
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