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The Phil Spector Trial: We Watch Court TV So You Don't Have To (06/13)

June 13, 2007 11:50 AM ET

WHAT HAPPENED YESTERDAY?
Dr. Steve Renteria, LA Sheriff's Dept. criminologist, was back on the stand. Renteria testified that there was "sexual contact" between Phil Spector and Lana Clarkson, a conclusion he drew after finding Clarkson's DNA on Spector's genitals and Spector's saliva on Clarkson's breasts. There's no evidence the two actually had sex, but that fact ties into the prosecution's theory about Spector's possible motive. Clarkson was wearing her purse when she was shot, which implies that she was leaving at the time. The prosecution suggests that after some minor foreplay, Clarkson attempted to leave, which enraged Spector and resulted in him shooting her.

IS THIS GOOD OR BAD FOR SPECTOR?
Both. The prosecution succeeded in suggesting a believable motive for murder, but on cross-examination the defense showed that Spector's DNA wasn't directly found on the murder weapon.

HAIR & WARDROBE UPDATE:
Spector wore a relatively subdued gray jacket, black shirt, and maroon tie.

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

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