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The New Smart-Phone Haters

Meet the rockers and other stars leading the charge against technology

Win Butler of Arcade Fire
Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images
November 22, 2013 2:55 PM ET

Trend alert! Stars are raging against the tiny machines that rule our lives. A brief survey:

Win Butler: Arcade Fire's excellent new Reflektor is – among other things – the year's funkiest diatribe against shiny flat things. "We fell in love when I was 19," sings Butler. "Now I'm staring at a screen." Ooh, burn!

Win Butler Reveals Secret Influences Behind Reflektor

Louis C.K.: The comic went on a brilliantly cranky rant on a recent Conan: "You never feel completely sad or completely happy [on a smartphone]. You just feel kind of satisfied with your product, and then you die."

Jonathan Franzen: The author of The Corrections and Freedom published a 6,300-word screed against "technoconsumerism" in England's The Guardian. It got more than 10,000 "shares" on Facebook.

Aziz Ansari: One of his latest bits is about how texting has made it too easy for dates to blow him off: "It's like you're a secretary for this shoddy organization scheduling the dumbest stuff with the flakiest people ever."

This story is from the December 5th, 2013 issue of Rolling Stone.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

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