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The Half Naked Truth About Blink-182

TheThree Stooges of rock & roll, and damn proud of it

August 3, 2000 12:00 AM ET

Below is an excerpt of an article that originally appeared in RS 846 from August 3, 2000. This issue and the rest of the Rolling Stone archives are available via Rolling Stone Plus, Rolling Stone's premium subscription plan. If you are already a subscriber, you can click here to see the full story. Not a member? Click here to learn more about Rolling Stone Plus.

Early in the morning in a parking lot just outside San Antonio, three skinny young men stumble from a bus and shield their eyes from the sun. Today the heat will top out in the mid-nineties. This is not a good place to find yourself first thing in the day.

"Fuck everybody and everything'" says Blink-182 bassist-vocalist Mark Hoppus. "I hope everyone catches gonorrhea and dies."

Hoppus has woken up on the wrong side of 8 A.M. to appear on the morning show of KRBE 104, an influential Top Forty radio station. The band — Hoppus, guitarist-vocalist Tom DeLonge and drummer Travis Barker — stands yawning, waiting to enter the studio. "There's no call for this," Hoppus insists, but the band's tour manager, Alex MacLeod, ignores Hoppus — he's heard these complaints many times before. MacLeod has officially limited him to fifteen minutes of kvetching per day.

Searching for a more receptive audience, Hoppus looks over at me, scribbling in my notebook. "Did you write down, 'I hope everyone catches gonorrhea and dies'?" he inquires. I show him his quote. Satisfied that his complaint has been heard, he nods with grim satisfaction.

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