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The Breeders Meet Buffy

Band will appear on show in November

October 4, 2002 12:00 AM ET

After spending months covering the theme to Buffy the Vampire Slayer during their live shows, the Breeders will join Sarah Michelle Gellar and the rest of the cast for an episode of the UPN teen slasher show this November.

"I like Buffy," says frontwoman Kim Deal. "They have all these bands on at the Bronze [Buffy's local hang out] so me and [sister/guitarist] Kelley were thinking, 'Wouldn't it be cool to be one of those bands? Maybe we could be playing this song and someone could get bit or something.'"

The Deal sisters will get their wish in an episode entitled "Him." The show's producers contacted the band after one of its Southern California gigs this summer. "There was a couple of people that work on the show that came out and saw us play 'cause we do the cover," Kim says. "Seth Green [a sometime Buffy cast member] has a little crush on Kelly. He came to our last show. He's cute."

The Breeders are also using their time in Los Angeles to work on the follow-up to their sophomore effort Title TK (2002). According to Kim, they have a bunch of new songs written, including "Climbing the Sun" and "Aderley (No Time in the Meter)." The band plans to record them without a producer. "We don't really work with producers," Kim says. "We work with people who engineer well. We usually queue to tape and we don't do Pro Tools, so we don't need some guy to reinvent the kick drum."

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