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The Beatles' 'Magical Mystery Tour' Gets DVD, Blu-Ray Release

Iconic band's 1967 film has long been out of print

Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Ringo Starr and John Lennon in a scene from the film 'Magical Mystery Tour'
Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images
August 22, 2012 11:45 AM ET

The Beatles are releasing a restored version of their classic 1967 film, Magical Mystery Tour. The film, written and directed by the band, has been long out of print, but will be released on DVD and Blu-Ray. There's also a combined deluxe box set featuring both versions, along with a 60-page book and a reproduction of the mono double seven-inch vinyl EP containing the film's six Beatles songs: "Magical Mystery Tour," "The Fool On The Hill," "I Am The Walrus," "Flying," "Blue Jay Way" and "Your Mother Should Know." The EP was originally issued in the U.K. in 1967 to accompany the movie.

Magical Mystery Tour will be available October 8th. Select movie theaters will screen the film starting September 27th. Listings will be available on the Beatles' website.

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