.

The Academy Is... Hit the Studio for "Santi" Follow-Up LP

May 9, 2008 4:15 PM ET

"I would compare it to starting over," the Academy Is... singer William Beckett says of working on the band's third full-length album. "The way we felt on [2005's debut] Almost Here." Beckett, along with drummer Andy Mrotek, bassist Adam Siska and guitarists Mike Carden and Michael Guy Chislett entered a New York recording studio this week to begin production on the follow-up to last year's Santi. Armed with an estimated 20 tracks in "final form," the Chicago band will now determine what Siska calls "the best of" for the album's tracklisting.

 

While Almost Here leaned towards a poppier rock sound, Santi incorporated heavier guitars and a grittier edge thanks to the contributions of producer Butch Walker (Pink, Avril Lavigne). For their still-untitled next LP the Academy has paired with S*A*M and Dave, a.k.a. Sam Hollander and Dave Katz, who have worked with labelmates Gym Class Heroes on "Cupid's Chokehold" and Cobra Starship on "Snakes on a Plane" along with American Idol runner-up Blake Lewis. While the band is hesitant to assign a sound to the record, which is due at the end of the summer, Beckett maintains, "What we do is write songs, and we're going to stick to it."

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Stillness Is the Move”

Dirty Projectors | 2009

A Wim Wenders film and a rapper inspired the Dirty Projectors duo David Longstreth and Amber Coffmanto write "sort of a love song." "We rented the movie Wings of Desire from Dave's brother's recommendation, and he had me go through it and just write down some things that I found interesting, and they made it into the song," Coffman said. As for the hip-hop connection, Longstreth explained, "The beat is based on T-Pain. We commissioned a radio mix of the song by the guy who mixes all of Timbaland's records, but the mix we made sounded way better, so we didn't use it."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com