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Taylor Swift's Rock & Roll Diary

It's not easy being on the road, but Taylor Swift makes the best of it

Singer Taylor Swift is photographed behind the scenes at Us Weekly's cover shoot on September 24th, 2008 in Los Angeles, California.
Jason Merritt/FilmMagic
October 2, 2008

Living in a bus ain't pretty, but Taylor Swift has a couple of simple strategies to keep from feeling totally gross. "It's all about practicality," says the teen country star, who's opening for Rascal Flatts this fall. "I have daily contacts that you can just toss out, and I make sure I have standard shampoo and conditioner and makeup from, like, Wal-Mart, because I've learned that I will lose my makeup." Swift's second album is due out in November, and she says she's especially stoked to perform her new "You Belong with Me." "It's about being in love with your best friend," Swift says, "but he doesn't see it, because he's in love with a snobby, ridiculous, overrated girl."

This is a story from the October 2, 2008 issue of Rolling Stone.

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Song Stories

“Money For Nothing”

Dire Straits | 1984

Mark Knopfler wrote this song with Sting, and it wasn’t without controversy. The Dire Straits frontman's original lyric used the word “faggot” to describe a singer who got their “money for nothing and their chicks for free.” Even though the slur was edited out in many versions, the band, and Knopfler, still took plenty of criticism for the term. “I got an objection from the editor of a gay newspaper in London--he actually said it was below the belt,” Knopfler told Rolling Stone. Still, "Money For Nothing," undoubtedly augmented by its innovative early computer-animated video, stayed at Number One for three weeks.

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