Taylor Swift Trial: Everything You Need to Know About Groping Case

Singer set to testify in nine-day trial stemming from 2013 meet-and-greet incident

Taylor Swift is expected to personally testify in a Denver court after a long legal battle with Denver radio host, David Mueller. In 2015, Mueller sued Swift for making false accusations about groping her butt during a meet-and-greet in 2013 that resulted in his termination. Swift countersued one month later. 

On Monday, jury selection will take place for the trial that could last up to nine days, per Business Insider. Mueller is seeking $3 million in damages, according to the Associated Press. Swift is seeking $1, but hopes the case serves "as an example to other women who may resist publicly reliving similar outrageous and humiliating acts," her lawsuit says.

Here is a brief recap of the facts: 

The alleged "butt groping" occurred when Mueller took a photo with Swift before her 2013 Denver show on the Red tour.

According to the Denver Post, radio host Mueller was invited to a meet-and-greet with Swift during the Denver stop of her Red tour. Mueller and his girlfriend met and took a photo with Swift, during which time Swift later accused the DJ of inappropriately groping her butt. Mueller was removed from the concert after security guards tracked him down, and Swift's team gave the photo to the station. 

Mueller was fired two days after the meet-and-greet with Swift.

Mueller was fired on June 4th, 2013 after Swift's team gave the photo to the radio station. "The radio station was given evidence immediately after the incident," a spokesperson for Swift told People. "They made their independent decision." The photo was eventually leaked to TMZ and shows Mueller and his girlfriend standing on either side of Swift, with the DJ's hand placed behind the singer, just under her waist. It is unclear whether he is touching her.

Mueller sued Swift in 2015. 

Mueller sued Swift, claiming her false accusations did irreparable harm to his professional reputation and resulted in his wrongful termination. The DJ said in the filing that he had met "hundreds of celebrities" in the past but had never been accused of physical misconduct. Mueller also accused his boss, Eddie Haskell, of being the one who had touched the singer inappropriately.

One month later, Swift countersued Mueller for assault and battery. 

In a July 2016 deposition, Swift specified that Mueller had reached under her skirt and grabbed onto her "ass cheek." Swift's legal team has called the photograph "damning" proof of the incident. (Mueller's team argues that the DJ was simply trying to jump into the frame).

Swift and her mother will personally testify at Denver hearing. 

Andrea Swift and Swift's photographer from the meet-and-greet are just two of the witnesses that are expected to be called to the stand in the civil trial. The singer will also testify in what will be her first public acknowledgement of the incident and case. The Denver Post reports that Swift's legal team has already submitted 17 articles, university studies and academic papers focused on sexual harassment and violence as part of their court documents.

According to TMZ, 32 seats will be open to the public for those interested in the trial (the case has predictably drummed up plenty of buzz among Swift’s fans and locals). An additional viewing room with 75 seats will be set up elsewhere in the courthouse, with monitors for more interested parties to watch.