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Taylor Swift’s ‘WANEGBT’ Gets Makeover By Samuel L. Jackson

January 17, 2013 2:35 PM ET
Taylor Swift
Taylor Swift
Steve Granitz

If Taylor Swift’s method of dismissing an ex-boyfriend is, well, just too sweet for your taste—here’s a markedly harsher delivery of her smash hit kiss-off tune “We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together.”

No, we’re not talking about the Hanson version, for cripes’ sake! Django Unchained bad guy Samuel L. Jackson, who’s been known of late for his cinematically expletive takes on children’s books (Go The F--- To Sleep) and political ads (“Wake The F--- Up”), took it upon himself to give Swift’s song a bit of grit when he stopped by UK radio station Capital FM. Jackson apparently was inspired when a listener called in and asked him to give a message to her boyfriend (take that, dude).

Don’t worry, no F-bombs are dropped here. Jackson does, however, lean on the PG-13 side with the interpolation “You go talk to your dumbass friends”…and yes, something does get bleeped out.

Oh Taylor--cover your ears! Or, maybe not: The singer approved heartily of the cover, tweeting an enthusiastic "YES" in response to it. (For what it's worth, she also tweeted favorably last week about Walk Off The Earth's collaborative a cappella cover of "I Knew You Were Trouble.")

Related:

Taylor Swift's sexy new video

ACAs red carpet looks

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

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