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Taylor Swift, Betty White Enter 'Guinness World Records' Book

Both will grace 2014 edition along with Rihanna, One Direction and Bieber

Taylor Swift, Betty White.
David Livingston/Getty Images; James Devaney/WireImage
September 6, 2013 4:50 PM ET

Taylor Swift is officially a record breaker, according to the 2014 Guinness World Records. As People reports, Swift will enter the new edition of the book with the awkwardly specific title "First Solo Female with Two Million-Selling Weeks on the U.S. Albums Chart."

Backstage With Taylor Swift

But T-Swift isn't the only fresh-faced pop star to nab a spot in the legendary book: Rihanna has earned the title "Most 'Liked' Person on Facebook," while Justin Bieber is officially the "Youngest Solo Artist to Have Five U.S. #1 Albums" and "Youngest Musician with a Music Channel Viewed Three Billion Times." Meanwhile, One Direction have earned "Most Twitter Followers for a Pop Group."

The 2014 Guinness book isn't totally dominated by young pop stars: The 91-year-old Betty White has been recognized for her incredible (and incredibly lengthy) career in television, earning "Longest TV Career for an Entertainer (Female)."

"The book has always been fascinating to me," White noted in a statement. "I can't believe I'm now associated with it."

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

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