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Taio Cruz Promises More 'Dynamite' on New Album

U.K. pop singer and songwriter's 'TY.O' comes out December 6th

October 6, 2011 12:25 PM ET
taio cruz dynamite
Taio Cruz performs at Sainsbury's Super Saturday at Clapham Common n London.
Nick Pickles/WireImage

Don’t expect Taio Cruz to switch up his sound anytime soon. The U.K. pop singer and songwriter plans to stick with massive four-on-the-floor beats on TY.O, his third album due out December 6th, and the first since he conquered dancefloors with the giddy, inescapable anthem "Dynamite," from last year’s Rokstarr LP.

"I feel like it’s too early to mess with the branding," Cruz tells Rolling Stone. "I could have happily done an entirely Motown-inspired record, but I just think it would confuse people."

Instead, Cruz re-teamed with "Dynamite" producer Dr. Luke for "Hangover," the album’s first single featuring party rapper Flo Rida, and a song about being sloppy drunk and loving it. Cruz wrote the tune after a few nights of partying with friends in Ibiza. "I don't really drink alcohol myself, but the scenery going on around me definitely inspired the music," he explains. "The lyrics are a bit risque, but they're a mirror to most people's weekly, if not nightly, antics, and I wanted to make a song that was a true representation of all the partygoers out there. People party, they drink, and they have hangovers – I'm not making this up!"

Cruz also tapped A-list producers RedOne, Swedish House Mafia and David Guetta for TY.O.  "I can tell you that there’s definitely a couple of ‘Dynamites’ on there," he teases. "I’m definitely not bored of the up-tempo dance electro sound. I’m not going to change it until I feel like I want to do something else."

All that said, Cruz does admit to feeling some pressure this time around. "It’s a much bigger deal now, being released in so many different countries and having so many different record label heads call me and my manager up," he says. "But I’m really happy with the songs that I’ve done, and I try to keep it that simple. If they make me smile when I listen to them, that’s enough."

Related
Reviewed: Taio Cruz, 'Hangover' 
David Guetta, Swedish House Mafia Storm Electric Daisy Carnival

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

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