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Streets, Franz See Mercury

Winner of U.K. prize to be announced in September

July 20, 2004 12:00 AM ET
The Streets' A Grand Don't Come for Free, Franz Ferdinand's self-titled debut, Belle and Sebastian's Dear Catastrophe Waitress, Basement Jaxx's Kish Kash and Joss Stone's Soul Sessions are among the albums nominated for U.K.'s prestigious Mercury Prize. The Mercury Prize is an annual honor bestowed on the best album released by a British artist.

The twelve albums that made the Mercury short list -- which also includes Keane's Hopes and Fears, Amy Winehouse's Frank, Jamelia's Thank You, Robert Wyatt's Cuckooland, Snow Patrol's Final Straw, Ty's Upwards and the Zutons' Who Killed . . . the Zutons -- were selected by a panel of judges, who will meet in September at the Mercury Prize Awards show in London to choose a winner.

Previous Mercury Prize winners include PJ Harvey's Stories From the City, Stories From the Sea, Badly Drawn Boy's The Hour of Bewilderbeast, Primal Scream's Screamadelica and last year's winner, Dizzee Rascal's Boy in da Corner.

A compilation album of songs from this year's nominees will be released in the U.K. in August.

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Song Stories

“Bizness”

Tune-Yards | 2011

The opening track to Merrill Garbus’ second album under the Tune-Yards banner (she also plays in the trio Sister Suvi), “Bizness” is a song about relationships that is as colorful as the face paint favored by Garbus both live and in her videos. Disjointed funk bass, skittering African beats, diced-and-sliced horns and Garbus’ dynamic voice, which ranges from playful coos to throat-shredding howls, make “Bizness” reminiscent of another creative medium. “I'd like for them not to be songs as much as quilts or collages or something,” Garbus said.

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