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Stones Get Studio, Television, Movie

The project will cost nearly two million dollars when completed

Portrait of The Rolling Stones from 1968.
Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images
January 20, 1968

The Rolling Stones' own television and recording studio in London is nearly underway. Four sites in London are under consideration for the studio which will have the capacity to handle TV promotional film production. The venture will cost nearly two million dollars, all of it provided by American backers, although the Stones will own it.

Once the studio project is actually underway, the Stones intend to proceed with plans to start their own record label. Reports are that, in addition to the Stones themselves and whatever acts they may sign, the new label will also handle United Kingdom release of Cameo-Parkway product, a catalogue that is owned by their American business manager.

The Rolling Stones, 1963-1969: Behind-the-Scenes Snapshots

At this point there are no plans or arrangements for the Beatles to be involved in the studio or label. Mick has merely mentioned the idea to the Beatles, who have just "expressed interest."

On top of these projects, Mick Jagger has accepted a story line for a movie starring the Stones. Tentative plans call for on-location shooting abroad, and a French director.

This story is from the January 20th, 1968 issue of Rolling Stone.


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