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Stone Sour Renew Their Fury on 'Gravesend' - Song Premiere

Slipknot singer's side project finds clarity in a sonic storm

Stone Sour
Chapman Baehler
March 29, 2013 9:00 AM ET

Corey Taylor and his band Slipknot haven't released an album since 2008's All Hope Is Gone, but the singer's been busy with his  Sound City collaboration with Dave Grohl and his other band, Stone Sour. The Iowa rockers are almost ready with the second part of their House of Gold and Bones album series, and on the new track "Gravesend," Stone Sour rage like an inferno. Walls of distortion and pummeling, mid-tempo drums crash with Taylor's growls and barks, but within the chaos comes clarity: "I was only 18 when I finally let go," he sings.

Corey Taylor on His Ambitious New Project With Stone Sour

House of Gold and Bones Part Two will be out April 9th on Roadrunner. Stone Sour begin touring the States on April 2nd at Portland, Maine's State Theatre and wrap up on May 18th at Columbus, Ohio's Crew Stadium at the Rock on the Range Festival; the following month, they go to Europe. For more information and full dates, visit the band's website.

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

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