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Stolen Tom Petty Guitars Recovered by Police

Rocker 'touched by the outpouring of good wishes and concern'

April 18, 2012 8:50 AM ET
tom petty
Tom Petty performs in Irvine, California.
C Flanigan/Getty Images

All five guitars stolen from Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers last week have been recovered by the police. As Rolling Stone previously reported, the guitars went missing from a soundstage in Culver City, California where the band had been rehearsing for their upcoming world tour.

In a statement issued on his official website, Petty says, "I am extremely grateful to the Culver City Police Department for a job well done, and touched by the outpouring of good wishes and concern from our fans and friends."

The stolen gear included a 1967 blonde Rickenbacker, a 1967 Epiphone Sheridan, a 1965 Gibson SG TV Jr., a Fender Broadcaster and a Dusenberg Mike Campbell Model, which belonged to Campbell himself.

Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers will now kick off their tour tonight in Broomfield, Colorado, with all of their guitars in hand.

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