.

Stevie Nicks Apologizes for Saying She'd 'Strangle' Nicki Minaj

'It was very out of character for me and I deeply regret what I said'

Nicki Minaj and Stevie Nicks
Paul Zimmerman/WireImage; Sonia Moskowitz/Getty Images
October 10, 2012 5:05 PM ET

Stevie Nicks is "truly sorry" for her aggressive statements towards Nicki Minaj after Minaj reportedly threatened Mariah Carey on the American Idol set, notes the Hollywood Reporter. Nicks, who appeared as a guest mentor on Season 11 of Idol, told the Daily yesterday, "How dare this little girl!... If I had been Mariah, I would have walked over to Nicki and strangled her to death right there."

Today, Nicks backtracked. "I want to apologize for my remarks about Nicki Minaj's behavior toward Mariah Carey, which I said during a long and exhausting day of interviews," the Fleetwood Mac singer said in a statement. "It was very out of character for me and I deeply regret what I said. I feel very protective toward Mariah Carey, who has gone through many difficulties in her life, and I spoke without thinking. I think all artists should be respectful toward one another and that includes me. I am truly sorry." Idol producers have denied a feud between Carey and Minaj.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Stillness Is the Move”

Dirty Projectors | 2009

A Wim Wenders film and a rapper inspired the Dirty Projectors duo David Longstreth and Amber Coffmanto write "sort of a love song." "We rented the movie Wings of Desire from Dave's brother's recommendation, and he had me go through it and just write down some things that I found interesting, and they made it into the song," Coffman said. As for the hip-hop connection, Longstreth explained, "The beat is based on T-Pain. We commissioned a radio mix of the song by the guy who mixes all of Timbaland's records, but the mix we made sounded way better, so we didn't use it."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com