.

Stevie Nicks Advises Katy Perry on Her Pop Rivals

'Never say that word again,' Fleetwood Mac singer tells the star during three-hour chat

Stevie Nicks, Katy Perry
Gabriel Olsen/WireImage; Francois G. Durand/Getty Images
January 7, 2014 11:10 AM ET

Stevie Nicks offered Katy Perry a choice nugget of rock star wisdom during a lengthy conversation back in September: "You don't have any rivals." In a new interview with ABC Radio, Nicks opened up about meeting Perry in London while she was in town with Fleetwood Mac and Perry was set to play this year's iTunes festival.

"I thought it was going to be a 20-minute 'Hey, how are you doing?' thing – and we sat for three hours until, like, three in the morning," Nicks said. "And we pretty much talked about everything."

See Which Artist Katy Perry Found Herself in a Surprise Feud with This Year

Specifically, Nicks recalled, Perry asked who her rivals were around the time she began her solo career with the release release of 1981's Bella Donna. "And I was, like, speechless," Nicks said. "I was, like, 'I didn’t have any rivals.' And she said, 'Really? None?' I said, ‘No . . . the girls in Heart [were] friends. Pat Benatar [was a] friend."

While Perry didn't single out any of her peer performers as rivals, she told Nicks that fans on the Internet tend to pit female singers against each other even if there's no basis for such claims.

"I said to her, 'Katy, let me tell you something. You don’t have any rivals. So forget that. Never say that word again,'" Nicks continued. "'You don’t have rivals. All of those girls? Friends. You'll probably work with all of them at some point. Friends.'"

Nicks' advice certainly seems to have resonated with Perry, who dismissed any sort of rivalry between herself and Lady Gaga during an interview with Entertainment Weekly about a month after she spoke with Nicks. At the time, Perry's "Roar" and Gaga's "Applause" had battled it out on the charts ahead of the fall release dates of their latest albums, Prism and Artpop – and, not to mention, an episode of Glee built around their music – but Perry extinguished any notion of contention.

"Gaga and I like to publicly dismiss it because it’s not healthy," she said. "You want to feel music. You want it to resonate and relate to you. You can’t look at it like a competition because you ruin the reason why you love music. But I think that sometimes our fan groups are so big and strong, they use it as ammunition."

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Wake Up Everybody”

John Legend and the Roots | 2010

A Number One record by Harold Melvin and the Bluenotes in 1976 (a McFadden- and Whitehead-penned classic sung by Teddy Pendergrass) inspired the title and lead single from Wake Up!, John Legend's tribute album to message music. The more familiar strains of "Wake Up Everybody" also fit his agenda. "It basically sums up, in a very concise way, all the things we were thinking about when we were putting this record together in that it's about justice, doing the right thing and coming together to make the world a better place," he said. Vocalists Common and Melanie Fiona assist Legend on this mission to connect.

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com