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Steven Tyler Sues Faux-Steven Tylers Over Impersonator Blogs

September 25, 2008 10:51 AM ET

Aerosmith's Steven Tyler has sued a pair of unknown bloggers for reportedly impersonating the frontman on the internet. In the lawsuit, Tyler complains that bloggers writing as Tyler provided intimate details concerning the singer's actual life, including discussing the death of Tyler's mother and impersonating Tyler's girlfriend. Tyler was first hit by faux blogs in 2007, but Google intervened to take the sites down. This year, Blogspot was the host of the Tyler impersonators, but those sites have been shut down due to "service violations." The lawsuit accuses the unknown bloggers of "public disclosure of private facts, making false statements and misappropriation of likeness." The suit also seeks an injunction to prevent the bloggers return in 2009.

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Company Auctioning Rights to Songs By Aerosmith, Underwood, Starr

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Song Stories

“Money For Nothing”

Dire Straits | 1984

Mark Knopfler wrote this song with Sting, and it wasn’t without controversy. The Dire Straits frontman's original lyric used the word “faggot” to describe a singer who got their “money for nothing and their chicks for free.” Even though the slur was edited out in many versions, the band, and Knopfler, still took plenty of criticism for the term. “I got an objection from the editor of a gay newspaper in London--he actually said it was below the belt,” Knopfler told Rolling Stone. Still, "Money For Nothing," undoubtedly augmented by its innovative early computer-animated video, stayed at Number One for three weeks.

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