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Steel Pulse Celebrate Obama in 'Paint It Black' - Song Premiere

British reggae veterans throw party for President 44

February 18, 2013 8:00 AM ET
Steel Pulse
Steel Pulse
Richard Carlton

The Grammy-winning British reggae band Steel Pulse have returned with "Paint It Black," a new single that embraces the band's longstanding commitment to fighting injustice and promoting equality.

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"'Paint It Black' is a song that is dedicated to the hundredth anniversary of Rosa Parks but also serves as a testimony of the African diaspora that have survived Western world society," member David Hinds tells Rolling Stone. "Despite the disadvantages of slavery and colonialism, we have managed to have a man of color as a leader of this world, in the White House.” The group endorsed Barack Obama in 2008 and the song celebrates the political victory and social change of his reelection, right down to its chorus of, "We have to open up those doors for President 44."

Steel Pulse are currently working on a new album for release later this year, as well as a documentary about their 34-year career.

Click to listen to Steel Pulse's 'Paint It Black'

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