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Springsteen's "Working On A Dream" To Feature Eight Minute "Outlaw Pete," Danny Federici

December 9, 2008 10:13 AM ET

More details about Bruce Springsteen's upcoming Working On a Dream have emerged, thanks to Billboard. For starters, leadoff track "Outlaw Pete" clocks in at eight minutes, making it Bruce's longest studio song since The River's "Drive All Night" back in 1980. (It's safe to assume Springsteen will not be performing "Outlaw Pete" at this year's Super Bowl halftime show.) Other tracks on Working include "Tomorrow Never Knows," "Queen of the Supermarket" and the previously released "My Lucky Day" and "Working On a Dream." It was also revealed that E Street Band organist Danny Federici, who died in April 2008 from melanoma, and his son Jason Federici will also feature on the album. Working will be available January 27th on vinyl as well as a deluxe edition that will contain a DVD with 38 minutes of behind-the-scenes studio footage. The album's cover art was also unveiled, which you can see in the photo above.

Related Stories:
Springsteen Unveils New Video For "My Lucky Day"
Springsteen's "Working On A Dream" Hits Radio
Springsteen's Working on a Dream Confirmed: New Album Due January 27th
Bruce Springsteen Will Headline Super Bowl Halftime Show

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Song Stories

“Road to Nowhere”

Talking Heads | 1985

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