.

'Spider-Man' Musical Lawsuit Gets Court Date

U2's Bono and the Edge will attend May 28 trial

Julie Taymor, The Edge and Bono during the curtain call on the Broadway Opening Night for "Spider-Man Turn Off the Dark".
Bruce Glikas/FilmMagic
March 19, 2013 5:40 PM ET

U2's Bono and the Edge, director Julie Taymor and the other producers of the Broadway musical Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark will meet in court on May 28th in their legal battle over the infamous show. 

Taymor, who co-wrote the script and was the musical's first director, initially filed suit against the show's producers, plus composers Bono and the Edge, in November 2011 after they fired her from the disastrous, injury-prone show in March, the New York Times reports. Taymor filed a copyright suit claiming the producers were making money off her ideas and script and that she was owed $1 million. The producers countersued, claiming she had been fired for breach of contract.

'Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark' Reboot Escapes the Train-Wreck

Judge Katherine B. Forrest set the New York court date after four days of closed-door sessions that failed to produce any sort of settlement over copyright control and profits, despite coming to terms in principle in August. What's more, last February, both parties reportedly settled their dispute over Taymor's firing, with the producers withdrawing their breach of contract claim and allotting Taymor full royalty fees for her work.

According to a source, however, both sides are now at an impasse regarding creative rights and control of Spider-Man, as the producers are now considering future runs of the show and overseas tours. The anonymous source did add that the sides are still talking and that a settlement is possible.

Despite receiving mostly negative reviews and costing a whopping $75 million, Spider-Man has become a Broadway fan favorite, grossing more than $1 million a week. That number, however, is about the same as its weekly running costs, and the show has seen a dip in ticket sales recently.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“American Girl”

Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers | 1976

It turns out that a single with "American" in its title--recorded on the Fourth of July during the nation's Bicentennial, no less--can actually sell better in Britain. Coupled with the Heartbreakers' flair for Byrds jangle and Animals hooks, though, is Tom Petty's native-Florida drawl that keeps this classic grounded at home. Petty dispelled rumors that the song was about a suicidal student, explaining that the inspiration came from when he was 25 and used to salute the highway traffic outside his apartment window. "It sounded like the ocean to me," he recalled. "That was my ocean. My Malibu. Where I heard the waves crash, but it was just the cars going by."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com