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Spector Case Details Revealed

Reports offer conflicting tales of shooting

December 11, 2003 12:00 AM ET

Police reports pertaining to the February 3rd shooting of actress Lana Clarkson at Phil Spector's California mansion reveal that the famed producer's limo driver saw Spector emerge from his mansion with a gun in hand.

Adriano Desouza said he heard a single gunshot at 5 a.m. that morning and Spector, 63, walked outside and said, "I think I just shot her." The report also offered gruesome details of a blood-spattered .38 caliber Colt revolver and the victim's teeth scattered at the crime scene. The gun was retrieved by police at Clarkson's side.

Spector maintains his innocence in the shooting, claiming that Clarkson killed herself. "I didn't do anything wrong," he told Esquire this year, his only public comment on the shooting. "If they had a case, I'd be in jail right now." After a lengthy investigation, Spector was arraigned on November 20th. He has been free since the shooting on a $1 million bail. Spector's attorney, Robert Shapiro, said he has evidence supporting Spector's suicide claim. According to the Los Angeles Times, the coroner's report found gunshot residue on both of Clarkson's hands. Shapiro said the evidence is consistent with a self-inflicted shooting and vindicates his client.

If convicted, Spector could face life in prison without the possibility of parole.

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