Source: Dr. Murray Likely to Face Manslaughter for Jackson Death

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The investigation into Michael Jackson's death appears to be drawing to conclusion, as a source tells the Associated Press that prosecutors will seek involuntary manslaughter charges against Jackson's personal physician Dr. Conrad Murray, KTLA reports. As Rolling Stone previously reported, Jackson's death was ruled a homicide from acute intoxication of the powerful sedative Propofol, and Murray has long been the sole focus of the investigation since the King of Pop died of sudden cardiac arrest last June 25th.

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The law enforcement source, speaking anonymously because the investigation still hasn't officially closed, said Murray "will be prosecuted on a theory of gross negligence" after administering Propofol — a sedative mainly restricted to hospital use — to Jackson. As Rolling Stone reported in early December, a source told the Los Angeles Times that any charges filed against Murray were likely "months rather than weeks away" due to the "complex medical data" involved in the case. Murray has been at the center of the Jackson investigation from the beginning of the query; when police raided Murray's clinic and home last year, the search warrants said he was suspected of manslaughter.

According to KTLA, investigators have not yet handed over the evidence to the District Attorney's office, which would be the next step before charges are filed. According to reports, Murray's girlfriend Nicole Alvarez has already testified in front of a grand jury, as it's alleged that Murray was talking on the phone with her and not supervising Jackson after administering the Propofol and other sedatives. Murray recently resumed work at his Houston clinic, with British cameras filming his first day back on the job for an upcoming documentary. Murray has maintained throughout the investigation that there was no wrongdoing on his part.

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