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Sony Warehouse Fire May Have Been Raided by Professionals

New evidence suggests trained criminals used London riots for cover

August 31, 2011 4:30 PM ET
london riots warehouse sony
The Sony warehouse burning during the London riots
David Goddard/Getty Images

New evidence has emerged that suggests the blaze that destroyed the Sony DADC distribution center in London earlier this month was not caused by rioters, but instead was a carefully planned raid carried out by professionals, who used the riots as cover.

Sources within the security field have told the Telegraph that intruders at the facility wielded cutting equipment and spent two hours dismantling a security fence before breaking in. The source also says that the group stole goods and loaded them into a fleet of vans they brought to the warehouse. The original robbers are said to have left the scene by the time looters showed up to pick over the warehouse for CDs, DVDs, video game consoles and other goods.

Spokepersons for Sony and the Metropolitan Police in London have declined to comment on these claims while an investigation is still under way.

Related
Sony Warehouse Destroyed in London Riots
Independent Labels Cope with Aftermath of London Warehouse Fire
PIAS Resumes Shipping After London Warehouse Fire

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