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Sony to Announce New Online Music Service

On the same day that Apple is expected to reveal iTunes upgrades, Sony counters with news of a service scheduled to launch on the Playstation 3 next year

September 1, 2010 10:14 AM ET

With Apple expected to announce changes to iTunes and a new line of iPod Touch devices at a music-themed conference later today, Sony is asserting their own place in the digital music marketplace by unveiling a new music and video subscription service at a conference in Berlin, also today. According to The Financial Times (subscription only), the service will first be marketed to owners of the Playstation 3, who number in the tens of millions, before segueing to other devices like phones, DVD players, portable music players and computers. The service will launch sometime next year.

Sony was once a player in the digital music market with their Connect Music Store, but when that service shuttered in early 2008, iTunes firmed up their leading position. Sony has since dabbled with other web-based services, giving Bandit.fm a trial run in Australia and New Zealand since late 2008 (an eventual global launch is planned). According to The Financial Times, Sony's new service has been in the works for two years, and will likely include music from all the major record labels and not just Sony.

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Song Stories

“Money For Nothing”

Dire Straits | 1984

Mark Knopfler wrote this song with Sting, and it wasn’t without controversy. The Dire Straits frontman's original lyric used the word “faggot” to describe a singer who got their “money for nothing and their chicks for free.” Even though the slur was edited out in many versions, the band, and Knopfler, still took plenty of criticism for the term. “I got an objection from the editor of a gay newspaper in London--he actually said it was below the belt,” Knopfler told Rolling Stone. Still, "Money For Nothing," undoubtedly augmented by its innovative early computer-animated video, stayed at Number One for three weeks.

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